Please apply here or inquire about open positions at the LPS Qubit Collaboratory.

Responsibilities

NSA is home to one of the largest and most established in-house research organizations within the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), employing scientists with world-class skills in fields such as mathematics, physics, computer science, engineering, and cybersecurity. We collaborate with leading industries, universities, and national laboratories to advance core competencies, leverage work in overlapping disciplines, and solve some of the most challenging national security problems thought to be intractable by adversaries and commercial industry.

NSA’s Laboratory for Physical Sciences (LPS) attracts top technical talent who not only solve the nation’s urgent intelligence problems, but also invent what hasn’t been invented and concentrate on what will be needed five, ten, fifteen years down the road. Through its partnership with the University of Maryland (UMD), LPS offers a unique environment where university, industry, and federal government scientists collaborate on research in advanced communication, sensing, and computer technologies. To learn more about LPS, visit: https://www.lps.umd.edu

LPS is currently seeking experienced Engineering and Physical Sciences Researchers to lead advanced research efforts in the areas of: quantum systems for sensing and/or transduction; electromagnetics engineering that enable high-performance wireless communications; integrated photonics for High Performance Computing (HPC); and, active devices for beyond Moore’s law computing and cryogenic logic.

LPS Researchers are expected to contribute to their technical fields by publishing in high-impact, peer reviewed journals; collaborating and contributing broadly with academia, industry, and the national laboratories; and supervising students and postdoctoral fellows. In addition, researchers must demonstrate an ability to work well in a team environment toward mission-oriented research goals, to provide unique and sometimes extraordinary subject matter expertise to the Intelligence Community (IC) and wider U.S. Government (USG), and to ' when appropriate ' bring their inventions to prototype or practical implementation.

In addition, Lead Researchers are expected to:

  • Perform scientific research to include planning, designing, and constructing specialized equipment, while ensuring adherence to sound engineering and scientific standards and principles
  • Understand the IC problem space to create and execute a research strategy that contributes to IC mission needs
  • Pursue research funding and build a team to include student and postdoc positions
  • Collaborate with UMD Physics, JQI, etc. and across academia and industry to advance NSA research interests
  • Serve as a subject matter expert to support research and development efforts to propel mission efforts to other parts of the Agency and USG
  • Attend conferences and communicate with professionals in the technical field to keep abreast of new technologies and information

LPS has a number of unique positions available where your skills and expertise can make a difference. Each position is described in more detail below, along with specific responsibilities and required skills/experience levels. Since there are several open positions, applicants should include the position title in your cover letter. Specific opportunities include:

Lead Researcher: Quantum Systems for Sensing and/or Transduction

LPS is seeking a highly motivated experimentalist to lead a new laboratory dedicated to exploring quantum systems for sensing and/or transduction. LPS has a long tradition of pioneering research in novel optical, cryogenic, superconducting, and quantum devices and materials for future information technologies, with quantum computing being a particularly strong investment over the last twenty years. This new lab will seek to expand on that base of expertise by pursuing fundamental research in quantum systems with potential application in, for example, near- or far-field sensing of electromagnetic fields, high-fidelity transduction of qubit modalities or frequencies, and/or integrated photonics/optomechanics. This new research area is expected to provide new opportunities for internal Agency and external community collaboration, especially for technical challenges and applications requiring high sensitivity and precision.

Although LPS researchers are encouraged to collaborate and pursue research funding opportunities internal to the Agency and across the USG, many LPS research projects are self-funded. This new lab is expected to be provided with start-up funds, including multi-year support for 1-2 students or postdocs.

The ideal candidate has a proven track record of innovative research in technical areas of direct relevance to sensing and/or transduction with quantum systems. Preferably, the demonstrated expertise should be in several of the following technical areas, and complementary to LPS interests and existing research direction:

  • Novel research explorations for sensing (e.g., electric, magnetic, or other near-field sensors) with quantum systems (e.g., defects in solids, nano/optomechanical devices, superconducting or other systems)
  • Studies of quantum-controllable optical defects in silicon-related material (i.e., silicon carbide)
  • Methods and techniques for fast quantum measurement and control (e.g., optical spectroscopy of defects, precision quantum control and readout)
  • Nano/optomechanics for quantum transduction between qubit modalities or frequencies
  • Chip-scale photonics in multiple materials
  • Semiconductor epitaxy, lithography, and etching techniques
  • Nonlinear waveguide (phase matching techniques) and nano-photonic (photonics crystals) design and fabrication
  • Industry/foundry capabilities in photonics and associated materials
  • Classical integrated photonics and opto-mechanics for HPC

Lead Researcher or Researcher: Disruptive Qubits for Quantum Information Science

LPS is seeking independent and exceptional scientists to lead new fundamental research efforts in the physics of solid-state qubits and enabling technologies, and contribute to mission-oriented research projects. Over the last 25 years, LPS has played a major role in building the quantum computing community through broad extramural research programs and impactful internally funded laboratories. The new Quantum Information Science (QIS) program will greatly expand these internal and collaborative research projects over the coming years.

Although LPS researchers are encouraged to collaborate and pursue research funding opportunities internal to the Agency and across the USG, many LPS research projects are self-funded. New research efforts in the QIS program can be expected to be provided with sufficient support to be successful.

The ideal candidate has a proven track record of innovative research in technical areas of direct relevance to novel solid-state qubits and/or enabling technologies. Demonstrated expertise and interest should be in at least one of the following technical areas:

  • Experimental physics of superconducting-semiconducting quantum systems (Super|Semi Lab). New and emerging qubit research, superconducting-semiconductor devices, and fundamental challenges at the intersection of superconducting and semiconducting qubits. Ability to provide rapid test feedback for Molecular Beam Epitaxy and Atomistic Fabrications Labs. Desire nanoscale fabrication background or fast measurement expertise, and semiconductor qubit or superconducting qubit experience.
  • Experimental physics of spin-based qubits. Advance state of semiconductor spin-based qubits, to include exploration of means of accelerating and democratizing progress in quantum dot qubits through testbeds, and materials for spin-based quantum computing.
  • Theoretical physics of quantum device modeling and simulation or advanced qubits. Requires deep expertise in quantum device modeling and simulation, particularly computational techniques relevant to semiconductor heterostructure or super-semi interfaces, and/or expertise in the theory of novel qubits in solid-state.

Lead Researcher: Active Devices for Beyond Moore’s / Cryologic

LPS is seeking a motivated experimentalist to lead a new research effort to discover, understand, and optimize novel devices for HPC. In the ‘Beyond Moore’s Law’ era, the exploration of computing devices operating at very high speed, low-power, or offering greater functionality for memory and logic are critical to the development of future information technologies. LPS seeks to add to its growing number of research labs in novel classical computing devices and paradigms, which include laboratories for 2D and topological materials, superconducting reversible logic, and cryogenic interconnect for novel HPC, in addition to an entire office focused on novel architectures and system-level considerations for Advanced Computing Systems (ACS). This search is not predetermined towards a specific technology; rather, LPS seeks a researcher with skillsets and a fundamental research strategy that complements and enhances existing efforts. This new research area is expected to provide opportunities for internal Agency and external community collaboration, especially for future computing systems of relevance to the NSA.

Although LPS researchers are encouraged to collaborate and pursue research funding opportunities internal to the Agency and across the USG, many LPS research projects are self-funded. This new research effort is expected to be provided with start-up funds, lab space, and materials, as well as being able to take advantage of existing beyond Moore’s and cryologic labs, fabrication and measurement infrastructure.

The ideal candidate is someone whose research interests complement current NSA investments in fabrication, measurement, and materials development for HPC, and who has a proven track record of innovative research in technical areas of direct relevance to active devices for beyond Moore’s law computing and cryogenic logic. Preferably, the demonstrated expertise should be in several of the following technical areas, and complementary to LPS investments in fabrication, measurement, and materials development for HPC hardware, including laboratory work in quantum materials and cryogenic logic:

  • Novel transistor development (e.g., ultra-low power, neuromorphic, superconducting, spin-tronic, optical) and impact on traditional and unconventional computer architectures.
  • Fast measurement and circuit design (including GHz rate logic)
  • Design, fabrication, and evaluation of logic and memory devices operating at cryogenic temperatures; and/or logic and memory devices utilizing novel material systems
  • Active electronic device research complimentary to quantum materials or cryogenic logic.
  • Industry/foundry capabilities in transistor-level device development and associated materials

Please apply here or inquire about open positions at the LPS Qubit Collaboratory.